Law, Cognitive Technologies & Artificial Intelligence
New Study Programme for 21st Century Legal Experts

1Introduction to AI and Regulation

- Friday, 8 December 2017
- 9 am to 12 noon

Course content

This course seeks to map out the potential regulatory needs created by cognitive technology and AI. More specifically, the goals of the course are to:

  • Provide an overview of the state of play in relation to the introduction of AI in society;
  • Set out the main regulatory options discussed in the scholarship in relation to AI (disciplinary, functional and instrumental);
  • Envision the issue in terms of the consequences of the introduction of AI technology in society, and proceed on this basis to explore alternative consequentialist regulatory responses;
  • Understand the implications of those distinct regulatory approaches in dedicated fields of the law, i.e. liability law and the law of war. Students who take this course will gain a good understanding of a) potential regulatory issues relating to AI, and b) theories of regulation.

Speakers

Bjoern Juretzki, Policy Officer, European Commission - DG Connect
Nicolas Petit, Professor, ULiege and Research Professor, University of South Australia
Jonathan Sage, Government and Regulatory Affairs, IBM


 

2Regulation of Data

- Friday, 26 January 2018
- 9 am to 12 noon

Course content

Big data is critical for the operation of AI and expert systems. At the same time, data is not free of regulation. In the EU, the General Data Protection Regulation is entering into force next year, and it is set to revamp entirely the way private and public organisations process data. At the same time, data posted on Internet platform brings about complex tradeoffs between free speech and privacy. Last, but not least, in the legal tech field, the training data on which legal analytics tools work generates interesting challenges in terms of representativeness, neutrality and anonymity.

Speakers

Christian D'Cunha, Head of Private Office of Giovanni Buttarelli, European Data Protection Supervisor
Laurent De Muyter, Of Counsel, Jones Day
Inge Graef, Assistant Professor, Tilburg University


 

3Algorithmic Decision-Making and Compliance

- Friday, 23 February 2018
- 9 am to 12 noon

Course content

  • This session discusses use-case applications of algorithmic technologies through the various law enforcement layers, namely courtroom litigation, decision-making by administrative agencies and deliberation by legislative bodies.
  • Can and should ex ante deliberation by legislative bodies be open to algorithmic assistance?
  • Can and should ex post judicial and decision-making activity be open to algorithmic assistance, and what role should be reserved for judges and decision-makers in this process?
  • Should certain types of judicial and decision-making functions be reserved for humans (such as deciding guilt or innocence), while others can be delegated to machines (such as determining sentences)?

Speakers

Alexandre De Streel, Professor, UNamur
Vanessa Franssen, Professor, ULiege & KULeuven
Ashwin Ittoo, Professor of Information Systems/Business Analytics, HEC ULiege


 

4Ethics and AI

- Friday, 23 March 2018
- 9 am to 12 noon

Course content

AI applications raise dozen ethical dilemmas. Shall a self-driving car follow its lawful trajectory and lethally hit a young biker, or shall it stray from its course, hit a tree and kill its old passenger? Similarly, what shall we do when an AI application reveals hidden correlations which denote human biases in society? Those issues necessitate the specification of initial ethical values. In addition, at the instrumental level, a discussion must take place on the methods methods used to address ethical challenges – self-regulation, formal standardization, statutory obligations – and the stages at which this ought to be done – ex ante by design or ex post by training.

Speakers

Laurent Hublet, Advisor Digital Agenda, Cabinet of the Deputy Prime Minister Alexander De Croo
Philippe Lambrecht, Secretary General, FEB
Christophe Lazaro, Associate Professor, UCLouvain
Pierre Wolper, Professor, ULiege


 

5AI Applications for Lawyers

- Friday, 20 April 2018
- 9 am to 12 noon

Course content

  • Existing cognitive and AI legal technologies and associated legal services will be mapped out (e.g. e-discovery, online legal services, legal research, practice management software, intellectual property services, artificial intelligence legal tech, lawyers search, etc.).
  • Overview of the future of markets for legal services, including legal start-ups, legal data science and software providers, legal engineering services, etc.
  • Technology constraints created by law societies, bar associations, etc.

Speakers

Benoît Degrève, Managing Partner, IBM Global Business Services Belgium & Luxembourg
Erik de Herdt, CEO, Lex.be
Amiel Feldman, Partner, Reymond, Ulmann & Fischele 
Tomas van der Heijden, Head of Legal Research, Ross Intelligence
Maurits Westerik, Partner, Bird & Bird


 

6Initiation to Algorithm Design

- Friday, 18 May 2018
- 9 am to 12 noon

Course content

This course provides a first exposure to the history, theory and applied specification of algorithms. Through concrete examples taken from the field of legal analytics, the course will focus on providing some hindsight into how to think, structure and formalize a legal tech algorithm.

This specific session will take place at BeCentral, located in the heart of Brussels. BeCentral is all about closing the digital skills gap and accelerating Belgium's digital transformation. It is open to everyone seeking to advance their digital skills or in need of a digital transformation.They are geared towards increasing people's and companies' digital skills, irregardless of the stage of personal or professional development they are in. Their brand new Digital Campus welcomes and hosts residents and visitors sharing and contributing to their mission: exchange involving digital knowledge, expertise, insights and experiences intended to help people and companies forward.

 

7Future of the Legal Profession

- Friday, 15 June 2018
- 9 am to 12 noon

Course content

The advent of cognitive technologies is modernising the legal profession at a rapid pace. With the improvements in computation power, data availability, and cognitive technologies it is anticipated that many existing jobs in the legal community will likely change or even disappear. At the same time, cognitive technologies are poised to create new activities and occupations for lawyers. Possible examples include: quantitative legal predictor, legal process analyst, legal project manager, ODR practitioner, legal management consultant, legal risk manager.

Speakers

Jean-Pierre Buyle, Partner, Buyle Legal, and President, avocats.be
Koen Geens, Minister of Justice
Philippe Lambrecht, Secretary General, FEB
Saskia Mermans, Group General Counsel, KBC Group, and President, IBJ/IJE
Dirk Van Gerven, Partner, NautaDutilh